The path to fame and fortune isn’t paved with gold and inspirational memes

Maybe because I’ve seen so many of them, maybe because I no longer connect with them, I dunno, but I know that those inspirational memes like this:

From photo credit: symphony of love via photopin cc

Photo credit: symphony of love via photopin cc

Or this:

Photo credit: deeplifequotes via photopin cc

Photo credit: deeplifequotes via photopin cc

…no longer have that strong an effect on me.

OK, so the last one was nice.

But these inspirational memes do very little by way of giving me tools to overcome difficulties, or show me how someone aspirational has overcome whatever challenge he or she had.

I love when Hollywood stars come out with really insightful things to say. Viola Davis was recently featured in a Vulture article called Viola Davis’s 14-Step Guide to Happiness and the article said this about her thoughts on fear and failure: 

“Nobody tells you about failure,” Davis argues. “People always talk about winning, vision boards, getting what you want. People also don’t talk about fear. It’s always keeping fear at bay. Squelching it. Throwing it away. I’ve embraced fear and failure as a part of my success. I understand that it’s part of the grand continuum of life. I’ve been through it all. Breakups, heartache, and I’ve lost a parent already. So now I get it at this age, I get that that is it. That life literally is what you make it.”

I love that she says that fear and failure form her journey to success.  A lot of the time whenever I read about someone who’s achieved a lot in their lives, it’s always as if they’ve had clarity the whole way, they never wavered, they had this unyielding passion and tunnel vision attitude to success.

Which is great for them, but what if you don’t work like that? What if your idea of success is very different to the more traditional notions of success? What if success doesn’t mean fame but more a recognition of a job well done and recognition that you’re a thought leader or expert in your field?  What if success doesn’t mean riches but is more along the lines of comfort and not excess?  What if success means not reaching goal after goal and being disheartened after each goal is reached, but rather living through your life’s direction (I learnt this last idea from Sze Wing Yip, who told me that living a life based on your path and journey rather than goals was a better way to live – totally paraphrasing, but I’ve lived by it since she told me this)?

So Viola Davis’ article really got to me, it means that fear and failure are part of my journey to live my life’s direction, and as long as I keep reminding myself of what that is (so that I’m always asking, “what is the purpose of this?”) then I should be fine.

Articumalationising

Writing notes for a review (The Zero Theorem, Terry Gilliam’s new film), and this is my best note from it:

Bob, the young guy in the movie, is like the Andrew Garfield character from the Heath Ledger movie in the other Terry Gilliam film.

Written in a dark screening room with very little coffee.

I will refine and it will be brilliant.

 

What TV taught me and why I’m like this now

Just read this article from Huffington Post called 10 Movies This Child of the 80s Wants Her Kids to Learn From  and I LOVED IT! I’m not looking down the barrel of 40 like the author of the article, but I am definitely a child of the 80s. I am also the only child of two very over-protective parents, so if I wasn’t running around outside with a ragtag group of neighbourhood kids for safety, the parental unit preferred that I be indoors situated firmly in front of the box, watching whatever TV show or movie was appropriate for me at the time.

I loved that the article mentioned The Goonies, The Princess Bride and The Breakfast Club, three of my favourite movies of all time, because I took so much away from each of them. When you’re not allowed out a lot, you live in the make-believe world on the screen, and THANK GOD there was usually something great to watch. Television and movies now are still great, but TV now is a little bit harrowing for me. It takes a lot of emotion to sit through Breaking Bad, The Walking Dead and Game of Thrones. Do we need debriefing sessions every time we finish an episode?

Breakfast Club School

Outside the building they used to film The Breakfast Club at.

Anyway, I digress. I am a child of the 80s (and 90s), and like Allison Tate, I have very strong emotional connections to TV and film from that time. I’m so connected to them, that I think they’ve actually shaped my world view of how life was supposed to be and I am constantly being reminded that nope, life doesn’t always work like that. I don’t have kids of my own, but I’ve learned a lot from 80s pop culture! For example:

THE GOONIES

Everyone loves The Goonies because they were all different, they were such great friends, had that mad adventure together – without adult supervision – and did something great for Astoria (hahaha). The Goonies taught me that having an adventurous spirit was a cool thing coz cool stuff came out of it, and you got to have fun with your closest buddies. It also taught me that you need to have close buddies, otherwise you don’t get to do cool things. Real life equivalent was every time I went overseas looking for adventure.

FRIENDS

By far and away my favourite all-time TV show, although set in the 90s, I was still a kid when it debuted here so I’m counting it. Like The Goonies, Friends taught me that your friends are your family, so be tight with them. It also made me appreciate – and someday try to replicate – the mismatched dining chairs look. Friends also made me see that having mates from all walks of life was a good thing, coz there’s so much comedy gold to be found in differences of opinion, like in the episode when Ross was getting really annoyed at everyone for humouring Phoebe’s belief that a missing cat was the reincarnation of her mother. Real life equivalent is that none of my longtime friends work in the same industry as me, so when we all get together to bitch about work, we all sympathise with the generic “tough day, huh?”, but don’t know the exact ins and outs of each other’s jobs. That was a bad example. But now one of my friends actually lives in New York, so maybe she’s the real live equivalent to a Friends character now?

THE BREAKFAST CLUB

High school was sooooooooooooo not fun for me, but even the guys from The Breakfast Club made detention look like it was worth it. I never had any life-affirming moments like they did in this movie when I was in high school, or maybe I did but I was too far up my own ass in self-pity and teen angst to recognise it. The Breakfast Club made me see that someone recognises cliques, and how being in one makes you a supreme a-hole, and how sometimes, for a brief time, you don’t have to be the label people put on you and you can just be friends with whoever you want to be friends with. I don’t have a real live equivalent for this movie, but I still love it because it was well written and is one of my favourite movies. Oh, wait, I do have a real life equivalent, because today I am a basket case.

You know sometimes you wish life were like the movies or like the lives of people on TV? I kind of half believed it would be! And now here I am staring down the barrel of not 40 but maaaaaaan, what a rude awakening I’m getting! 😛